What to Write When Inspiration Goes on Strike

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What is On Your Competitor's Blog?

It is my hope that this is helpful as you sit down to compose. Let us know exactly what works for you. There are times when inspiration strikes (I've discovered that taking a stroll or washing machine helps), and then there are instances when inspiration belongs on attack. Where would you go to find great writing thoughts? Below are some suggestions to receive your creative juices flowing. You must always maintain tabs on what your opponents are publishing. Subscribe to their own newsletters, set up alarms, or search what they're putting out on JD Supra, Lexology and such. Then commit to providing an alternate. Did they do a thorough piece about the state's new privacy regulations? Fine. Enable them to own that. Don't replicate it. But long-form isn't for everybody. Produce a checklist or brief takeaway on this issue. Help break down larger issues into digestible chunks. When you get the hang of the the possibilities are infinite. Know the content landscape and make your specialty.

What's On Your Opinions?

Go back and look at your articles within the last three decades. If you've obtained an improved body of work, approximately half will be time-bound, or about specific occasions, and half will likely probably be more evergreen pieces. What did well in each class? Reprise those bits with an upgrade, or in a different format. Turn a listicle into a Q&A. Just take a popular general slice and tweak it for the business or sector you are specializing in today. Go deeper, more and with more granularityinto issues that did nicely. The post What to Write When Inspiration Goes Strike appeared first on Attorney at Work. If you are publishing in an interactive platform like LinkedIn, or even you listen from readers of your newsletter, then what are they saying? Let their involvement with your content inform you what things to write about next. I recently reposted a piece I wrote four years ago to my blog to LinkedIn. Apparently, the topic of the article is an issue that's still not resolved. With only a catchy new intro, I got a few of my very best readership stats in months -- and I know that's still a ripe theme that is excellent for a fresh post. Maybe two. Questions from customers or coworkers are a priceless resource. Take a minute to think about what issues are coming up in your exchanges. What appears to be tripping up clients and peers? It might not be regarding the law, specifically. It may be concerning pricing, customer management, the way to talk about a billing dispute, or how to handle a miscommunication. This requires more consideration, but this kind of review can often create some of your most enlightening pieces. In the San Francisco Bay Area, where I live, we are longing for Airbnb, Slack, Pinterest, Lyft and also Uber to go public, and mint a fresh crop of hundreds or even thousands of millionaires, with a few billionaires on the side. Stories so far have concentrated on which it will do to the area's residential housing market, already the most expensive in the country. But there is fodder here for at least those with real estate practices. Besides tales about the best way to negotiate in frothy markets, what type of terms sellers may agree to in all-cash deals, and if to consider relocating to escape taxation, the prosperity eruption will have consequences for those in real estate planning (pieces on the value of a will and trust), occupation legislation (what terms should companies contain in noncompetes, how to incentivize independently affluent employees), and others. The current government shutdown likewise provided a plethora of topics, including worker rights, tenants rights, and how to negotiate with creditors, etc.. Read the news through this picture: How will this event affect my clients, directly or indirectly? What questions can this increase in their own minds?

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What is On Your Competitor’s Blog?

It is my hope that this is helpful as you sit down to compose. Let us know exactly what works for you.
There are times when inspiration strikes (I’ve discovered that taking a stroll or washing machine helps), and then there are instances when inspiration belongs on attack. Where would you go to find great writing thoughts? Below are some suggestions to receive your creative juices flowing.
You must always maintain tabs on what your opponents are publishing. Subscribe to their own newsletters, set up alarms, or search what they’re putting out on JD Supra, Lexology and such. Then commit to providing an alternate. Did they do a thorough piece about the state’s new privacy regulations? Fine. Enable them to own that. Don’t replicate it. But long-form isn’t for everybody. Produce a checklist or brief takeaway on this issue. Help break down larger issues into digestible chunks. When you get the hang of the the possibilities are infinite. Know the content landscape and make your specialty.

What’s On Your Opinions?

Go back and look at your articles within the last three decades. If you’ve obtained an improved body of work, approximately half will be time-bound, or about specific occasions, and half will likely probably be more evergreen pieces. What did well in each class? Reprise those bits with an upgrade, or in a different format. Turn a listicle into a Q&A. Just take a popular general slice and tweak it for the business or sector you are specializing in today. Go deeper, more and with more granularityinto issues that did nicely.
The post What to Write When Inspiration Goes Strike appeared first on Attorney at Work.  Check out these sites:

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If you are publishing in an interactive platform like LinkedIn, or even you listen from readers of your newsletter, then what are they saying? Let their involvement with your content inform you what things to write about next. I recently reposted a piece I wrote four years ago to my blog to LinkedIn. Apparently, the topic of the article is an issue that’s still not resolved. With only a catchy new intro, I got a few of my very best readership stats in months — and I know that’s still a ripe theme that is excellent for a fresh post. Maybe two.
Questions from customers or coworkers are a priceless resource. Take a minute to think about what issues are coming up in your exchanges. What appears to be tripping up clients and peers? It might not be regarding the law, specifically. It may be concerning pricing, customer management, the way to talk about a billing dispute, or how to handle a miscommunication. This requires more consideration, but this kind of review can often create some of your most enlightening pieces.

In the San Francisco Bay Area, where I live, we are longing for Airbnb, Slack, Pinterest, Lyft and also Uber to go public, and mint a fresh crop of hundreds or even thousands of millionaires, with a few billionaires on the side. Stories so far have concentrated on which it will do to the area’s residential housing market, already the most expensive in the country. But there is fodder here for at least those with real estate practices. Besides tales about the best way to negotiate in frothy markets, what type of terms sellers may agree to in all-cash deals, and if to consider relocating to escape taxation, the prosperity eruption will have consequences for those in real estate planning (pieces on the value of a will and trust), occupation legislation (what terms should companies contain in noncompetes, how to incentivize independently affluent employees), and others. The current government shutdown likewise provided a plethora of topics, including worker rights, tenants rights, and how to negotiate with creditors, etc.. Read the news through this picture: How will this event affect my clients, directly or indirectly? What questions can this increase in their own minds?

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